How to gallop on a horse

Updated: Sep 17, 2020

Hi welcome back to my blog, I'm so happy to be writing this post as well. My school just started so I haven't really had time for the blog but I am back at it again! I hope you enjoy this post. I was thinking about doing a thing where if you ride you could make a video of you and just say your name, when you started horseback riding, why you started horseback riding, what your favorite things about the sport are, and I could post one video on my blog. I think it would be fun, and don't worry none of your private information like your location or anything will be shared. So you make the video, send it to me from my email @ sierrabythebay@gmail.com and I will post it.

Before you gallop

Before you gallop you want to make sure you have gone over walk, trot, canter. You also want to consider if you are ready to gallop. If you do not feel comfortable with trot or canter and you cannot do trot or canter then galloping would be a no. Galloping is faster than canter so you want to make sure your canter is good before you try to gallop.

Getting in the gallop

When you gallop start off with a canter. Make sure your horse's bridle path is down. You may notice when their head goes up they normally break canter or go into a trot. That's because their bridle path is up. To lower it hold the reins and use your fingers to wiggle them a bit. If you don't feel their a pull then you need to shorten your reins. Once they have put their head down and are successfully cantering you can attempt the gallop.

How to gallop

In the canter you are not supposed to lean forward. That is not the case with galloping. First get your canter going. When you are in the canter lean forward a bit and squeeze your legs to make them go faster. Keep your reins low and if you want you can rest them on their neck. If at any time you feel uncomfortable or unstable stop your horse.

How to sit the gallop

You are already in a forward position so sitting the gallop shouldn't be that hard. Make sure to press your heels down. This will help your legs feel more stable. Sit deep into the saddle and breathe. If you are relaxed your horse will be relaxed, but if you are nervous or scared your horse will feed off of your emotions and the gallop won't be as good.

I hope you liked my post. I won't be posting as often because of school and all but I will post at least twice a week. I will be doing the video so if I could have your video in 2-3 days that would be amazing. xx The Desert Rider


Look at this foal. # Adorable

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