My rescue work routine!

As you guys know, I work at a horse rescue every Saturday. Its always a pleasure seeing the horses and feeding them their grain. I get a lot of questions on how I spend my time at the rescue. I thought it would be fun to do a "what I do at the rescue" blog post so here it is!


If you are a horse owner or work for horses you know horses get crazy and I mean wild when its time for feed. They are in the paddock all day until night, when they go to their stalls and get fed dinner. In the paddock they have hay so they can graze all day if they like.

At night they are put in their stalls and enjoy their dinner until the morning when they get their breakfast.


The minute I walk into the rescue immediately I start taking their feeding bins and line them up in front of the grain room, and get them ready to have some grain dumped in them. Each horse gets one scoop of either maintenance feed or senior feed. Jack, the mini, only gets 1/2 scoop of grain because he is a mini and we don't want him to become overweight. Rojo and Annie also have one pill of Equinox supplement. There are 4 horses, and Jack the mini, so giving grain doesn't take too long.


After I feed them their grain I get the hay. I believe they eat Alfalfa but I don't know for sure. I get the wheelbarrow and take 6 flakes of hay and dump it in. I then go to the paddock and put a flake in each bin.


When its time to bring the horses to the paddock, or turnout (whatever you want to call it) there are a lot of different ways but this is my way. I always start with Sampson because horses like routine, and everyone always starts with Sampson. I walk into Sampson's stall, put on his fly mask, and then lead him out to the paddock. Then I close the door and repeat this process with the other horses. Its always so difficult to get Duck's fly mask on because she swings her head around like a moody teenager 😂. Rojo and Annie are pretty easy to bring to the turnout, as they are always kind of chill. Jack the mini has a large stall so he doesn't need to be turned out.

Little fun fact about Jack : His previous owners (before he came to the rescue) completely ignored him so he had gotten quite aggressive over the time he was with them, so nobody is allowed to put his fly mask on or go into his stall other than mucking out. Curry the barn owner comes to put his fly mask on, etc. if its necessary.


Now that the horses are in turnout I can muck out their stalls. Rojo and Sampson have the worst poop so we always have to cover their pee with sand so it dries. Annie and Duck don't have that bad poop but the boys have the worst Haha. I muck out their stalls and when I'm done usually an adult does the water because its hard turning on the pipe.


While the horses are receiving their water I like to groom them. I walk into the paddock and bring a curry comb, soft brush, and mane and tail comb with me. If the flies are being bad and annoying the horses I also bring some fly spray with me.

Duck likes to roll and every time I see her I'm like "Duck what happened?" because she has mud caked on her body. I try my best when grooming her, and we arent allowed to scrub the horses with water or anything so she never looks spotless but I do my best so the mud isn't as caked on. If her mane is being really bad I try my best but since I don't want to hurt her I don't get to far into detail with combing her mane. Some days I focus mainly on her mane, and somedays I focus on getting the mud off. I always try to groom all the horses but Annie doesn't like it for some reason and I don't want to get her aggravated so I just use a soft brush so it feels good. She is never too dirty anyways so its not a big deal.


Its always so sad leaving the rescue and I normally have a 101 goodbye with each of the horses so they know I will see them next week! If you have any questions on my routine I'd be happy to answer! I hope you enjoyed this post. Happy holidays! xx The Desert Rider



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